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Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

Framing square for stairs

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A carpenter square is a hand tool used in woodworking and metalworking to measure angles. The most common form consists of a laminated right triangle with one 90° corner and two 45° corners, giving three edges (the hypotenuse and two adjacent ones) each measuring 91.44°, and two legs each measuring 45°, although other variants exist.
Stair Stringer Primer Step 1: Cut a piece of 1 x 1 to the exact length of 6-3/8". Make sure both ends are square by trimming one off first, then measuring and cutting to length by cutting the opposite end. Move your framing square to near the end of the stringer material and place the 1 x 1 gauge along the outside edge of the 16" leg of the square.
By the way, the simplest way to extend riser or tread lines is to place a second framing square or a straightedge against the square with stair gauges. After establishing the lines for the first tread at the top of the stringer, slide the framing square down, so that the edge of the riser gauge lines up with the tread line.
Tom grew up using a traditional L-shaped framing square, which he still prefers for laying out a pattern rafter or a stair stringer. And anytime he's working in the shop, he keeps a combination square, with its sliding head, close at hand for gauging lines. On the job, though, Tom does most routine carpentry with a couple of speed squares. ...